CardBoard – the disposable whiteboard

CardBoard is a disposable whiteboard made from 4mm flat cardboard coated with dry-erase surface paint. It is lightweight, safe, and recyclable at the end of its life. CardBoard can be written on over 30 times without smudging. CardBoard is the perfect interactive tool for educators and parents.

 

School administrators will have the added benefit of not having to keep track of expensive inventory, and have safe (lightweight and not-sharp) individual whiteboards for each and every student to use.

 

Pre-Order CardBoard Now ($29.99 for a pack of 20)

 

 

Our Idea

Who are we?

I am a serial entrepreneur and chemical engineering new grad. My knowledge of materials and chemical coatings will help me construct and test the CardBoard, and allow me to manufacture the CardBoard in Canada as cheaply as it can be made in Chinese Factories. My experience in the education industry (Prep101) helps me gain unique perspectives of the education industry. This lets me market the product to educators. My online business experience helps CardBoard establish a web presence and start gathering valuable pre-orders.

What are we offering?

CardBoard is a disposable, cardboard based alternative to expensive, student-sized whiteboards. CardBoard is made for elementary school use. The base is thick cardboard, and both surfaces are coated in dry-erase paint. This 11″ x 17″ double sided whiteboard is erasable over 30 times without staining, and can be easily recycled when damaged.

This product costs the teacher less than $1.50 per piece. For $30 per classroom, the teacher can have many interactive activities for the students. School administrators will have the added benefit of not having to keep track of expensive inventory, and have safe (light and not-sharp) school equipment.

Who are we offering it to?

CardBoard is offered primarily to educators: elementary and junior high teachers, their schools, and their school boards. Each of the customer types have a vested interest in the quality of education of students, and also is heavily constrained by price limitations.

 

Why does that person care?

Educators care about the CardBoard because it gives them classroom learning opportunities for a low cost. The CardBoard can be used for any subject, from math to art.

It costs the school/teacher less than $2 per piece to buy, and they don’t have to worry about kids breaking expensive equipment.

For teachers, they pay for a large chunk of the classroom supply costs, especially in periods of school board austerity. CardBoard allows the teacher to offer a greater variety of educational experiences without becoming a burden on their wallets.

Our distinctive competencies

Unlike classroom blackboards, iPads and dry-erase boards, CardBoard is disposable, cheap, and easy to use.

CardBoard is unique in the sense that it can both be reused, and recycled/discarded whenever it is no longer being used. It bypasses the need for durability in the classroom. This is the “wow factor” of the CardBoard — it is ideally suited for elementary school students.

The substitutes & alternatives

Alternatives to CardBoard include regular, non-disposable lapboard whiteboards, and their blackboard alternatives. Regular student-sized whiteboards are expensive ($30-$60 each), bulky, and not very safe. Blackboards are the same, plus the issue of chalk dust.

Substitutes range between technologically advanced, like iPads and other interactive classroom devices, to simple, like pen and paper, or marker and drawing pad. The other alternative is to not have interactive lessons at all.

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Our Pitch

Our concept pitch

Our personal pitch

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The Value

Our first key person

Our first key person is is the elementary school or junior high teacher. These are educators who spends significant time and money improving learning experience. The care about students, and usually needs special equipment for interactive classes.

They care because CardBoard is an alternative to expensive ($30-$60 per unit) dry erase lapboards that schools currently use. It removes the burden of maintaining equipment for teachers, and reduces their out-of-pocket expenditure. In addition, CardBoard is light, safe, and has a useful lifespan that outlasts any classroom activity.

Our promise to them is a cheap, disposable, safe whiteboard alternative for students to use, abuse, and destroy.

There exists around 170 elementary and jr high schools in Calgary, each with an average of 30 classes. This is the equivalent of 5100 teachers.

Our second key person

Our second key person is parents of elementary school students. The parents care about their children. They like interactive lessons for their child(ren). They are price conscious about the cost of education.

They care because CardBoard allows a better educational experience for their children. The reduced costs associated with CardBoard means less cost gets passed onto students and parents. Plus, no risking your kid breaking stuff.

Our promise to them is an inexpensive white board alternative for interactive learning in the classroom.

Our third key person

Our third key person are school boards and school administrators. School boards care about the well being of students.They also care about the quality of education they provide, and about staying ahead in the curve when it comes to modern education trends such as interactive learning.

 

They care because school boards are very conscious of budget needs. CardBoard is safe, not-sharp, and light, excellent choice for classroom interactivity without any added risks. Because they no longer have to keep track of inventory of lapboards, and each student can get a CardBoard to keep, and the school can replace them whenever necessary for less than the cost of a coffee.

Our promise to them is a safe, inexpensive, reusable and disposable whiteboard alternative that not only improves learning but also reduces budget expenditures.

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Your feedback and ideas

Feedback on our idea and your assessment of it are incredibly important. Please provide yours below.

Giving feedback and making an assessment are pretty straightforward, but make sure you know how it's done »

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3 Comments

  1. Customer (C)

    7.5

    Value proposition (VP)

    5

    Substitutes & alternatives (SA)

    3.3

    People (P) on the team

    9

    Offering (O)

    7.3

    Distinctive competencies (DC)

    9.3

    I think the idea is marketable, especially on an economic and educational front with the “interactive learning”, however the notion of disposable has a negative connotation (with regards to the environment). Really emphasize the recycling aspect of the product.
    Is it really true that typical whiteboards would be more expensive, especially when you can get them from walmart or the dollar store? These products would also be plastic bonded to a base, as opposed to paint. The cost savings of the board itself may be offset by the price of dry-erase markers (notoriously expensive and prone to drying out, especially if children are responsible for capping them after use). How will this affect the purchasability of the product?

  2. Customer (C)

    8.4

    Value proposition (VP)

    9.3

    Substitutes & alternatives (SA)

    8.2

    People (P) on the team

    10

    Offering (O)

    8.7

    Distinctive competencies (DC)

    9.3

    Cool idea!

  3. Customer (C)

    9

    Value proposition (VP)

    8

    Substitutes & alternatives (SA)

    7.5

    People (P) on the team

    10

    Offering (O)

    10

    Distinctive competencies (DC)

    6

    The economic aspect makes a really strong point: $1.50 per student. That’s a deal. The problem I can see is that despite the disposable aspect being a distinctive competency, would it be worth spending $1.50 everytime the product gets destroyed, or would it be better to invest $30 on a more durable product. Also, although the education is shifting towards group learning, the education system teaches environmental consciousness; does the disposable aspect fit with the values of the education system?